Update on relevant trypanosome peptidases: Validated targets and future challenges.
Alvarez, V. E., Iribarren, P. A., Niemirowicz, G. T. and Cazzulo, J. J.
Instituto de Investigaciones Biotecnologicas "Dr. Rodolfo Ugalde", Universidad Nacional de San Martin - IIBIO, UNSAM-CONICET, San Martin, B1650HMP Buenos Aires, Argentina. Electronic address: valvarez@iib.unsam.edu.ar.
Instituto de Investigaciones Biotecnologicas "Dr. Rodolfo Ugalde", Universidad Nacional de San Martin - IIBIO, UNSAM-CONICET, San Martin, B1650HMP Buenos Aires, Argentina.
Trypanosoma cruzi, the agent of the American Trypanosomiasis, Chagas disease, and Trypanosoma brucei gambiense and Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense, the agents of Sleeping sickness (Human African Trypanosomiasis, HAT), as well as Trypanosoma brucei brucei, the agent of the cattle disease nagana, contain cysteine, serine, threonine, aspartyl and metallo peptidases. The most abundant among these enzymes are the cysteine proteases from the Clan CA, the Cathepsin L-like cruzipain and rhodesain, and the Cathepsin B-like enzymes, which have essential roles in the parasites and thus are potential targets for chemotherapy. In addition, several other proteases, present in one or both parasites, have been characterized, and some of them are also promising candidates for the developing of new drugs. Recently, new inhibitors, with good selectivity for the parasite proteasomes, have been described and are very promising as lead compounds for the development of new therapies for these neglected diseases. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: "Play and interplay of proteases in health and disease".
Biochimica et Biophysica Acta. Proteins and Proteomics 1869(2): 140577 (2021)